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Does Electric Tech Stop Hair Loss? Or is it Nonsense

9/20/2019 2:27:32 PM

Hair loss affects millions and possibly billions of people worldwide, but that doesn't make it any easier to accept. Truthfully, nothing ages you more than going bald. Every year we hear about a new treatment that is supposed to revolutionize the hair loss industry, and every year they fail. However, scientists at the University of Wisconsin have engineered a hair-growth-stimulating device that has been "shown" to stimulate hair regeneration. In this article, we will be going over Electric Tech as a possible treatment for hereditary hair loss.

How Does Electric Tech Work?

According to Xudong Wang, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Wisconsin-the device gathers energy from the body's day to day motion. The device uses low-frequency electric pulses to coax dormant hair follicles to regenerate. 

This device doesn't cause new hair follicles to sprout, but rather re-activate dormant hair follicles. According to researchers, this could be used as a prevention treatment for male pattern baldness. This device does not require a battery pack, because it is powered by the motion of the individual wearing the device. This device fits discreetly underneath an ordinary baseball cap. 

Professor wang says: "electric stimulations can help many different body functions, but before our work there was no really good solution for low-profile devices that provide gentle but effective stimulations."

Researchers claim that in side-by-side tests on hairless mice, the device stimulated hair growth as effectively as two different baldness medications. Unfortunately, they didn't state which medications. There are literally hundreds of medications that claim to stop androgenic alopecia (genetic hair loss). One could assume the medications the researchers were referring to were Rogaine (minoxidil) and Propecia (finasteride), but we doubt that. 

One of Many Low-Level Laser Devices

What Professor Wang, has described is nothing new or revolutionary. In fact, virtually every single low-level-laser therapy (LLLT) device claims to do the same thing. The only innovation with this device is that it is powered by your own energy. The only real-benefit for this device is that it can be worn underneath hats for a prolonged period of time. Typically, these LLLT helmets and devices are large and clunky, and look too ridiculous to wear in public.

Conclusion

This isn't the first time we've been sold on lasers and electrical devices. The industry is full of laser combs, helmets, hats, if you can put a laser on it, we're sure it's been made. The jury is still out on low-level laser therapy, and while it sounds enticing to regrow hair without having to take off your hat, we're highly skeptical. Moreover, stimulating hair growth and stopping genetic hair loss are not two different things. To date, there is no replacement for surgical hair replacement. Today, hair transplant surgery is king. Our verdict is this product is most likely nonsense.


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    All Articles by Melvin Lopez

    Melvin is an Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network and the Hair Loss Learning Center. He is 3 time hair transplant patient having received over 5,000 grafts via FUE. He has over 3,000 helpful posts on the popular hair restoration network discussion forum. He has over 13 years of experience in healthcare management. He enjoys helping hair loss sufferers overcome their insecurities and depression in relation to their hair loss. Aside from his healthcare management work, he writes articles, moderates the hair loss forum and creates YouTube videos for the Hair Transplant Network YouTube channel.